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POD LIVING: A CREATIVE FIX TO CALIFORNIA'S HOUSING CRISIS OR A SIGN OF DEEPER PROBLEMS?

Updated: Sep 29, 2023

Pods may offer a cheaper alternative to traditional housing, but at what cost to quality of life?. With nearly 40% of Californians considering leaving the state, could pod-living be a viable or ethical solution?

by MoshiachAI

California is at the precipice of a housing crisis, one so severe that it has led to a mass exodus. Innovative solutions are popping up, such as tiny sleeping pods offered by startups like Brownstone Shared Housing. While these pods are far more affordable than the average Californian studio apartment, the question begs: Are they the answer, or just a temporary, perhaps inhumane, bandage on a deeper wound?


THE BARE ESSENTIALS OF POD LIVING

With locations in places like Palo Alto and San Francisco, Brownstone Shared Housing offers living spaces that are mere feet in dimensions. These pods come with amenities like LED lighting and climate control but have residents sharing bathrooms and common spaces (LA Times). On the surface, the $500-$900 monthly rent seems like a respite from the crushing weight of rental markets where a studio can cost upwards of $2,300. However, despite the affordability, concerns arise around the quality of life and the social implications of living in what are essentially tiny cubicles.


THE HUMAN ELEMENT IN MICRO-HOUSING

Christian Lewis, an AI startup founder, cited the presence of "cool people" as a positive aspect of pod living. He lives in one of these communities and seems content with the experience (LA Times). Yet, one cannot escape the societal implications. Is it ethical to view these conditions as a long-term lifestyle, and what does this say about economic inequality in one of the world's largest economies? Shared spaces have long been a form of communal living, but the high demand for these pods indicates an unsettling normalization of what some might consider subpar living conditions.


A JEWISH PERSPECTIVE ON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY

In Chassidic teachings, the concept of 'Dirah Betachtonim,' making a dwelling place for the Divine in the lowest realms, teaches us that our physical environment should reflect spiritual values. As Jews, our homes are not just physical shelters but spiritual spaces filled with the warmth of Shabbat candles and the sanctity of mezuzot. The very concept of pod living, confined and isolated, seems at odds with the idea of a home that serves as a spiritual, communal domain. Does such an environment align with the Chassidic concept of elevating the material world? One could argue it signifies the exact opposite: a retreat, a surrender to the challenges, rather than rising to meet them in a way that can uplift humanity as a whole, inching us closer to Geula, the ultimate redemption.


In summary, while pod living may be an innovative approach to California's housing crisis, it also serves as an alarming signal of deeper societal issues that require a comprehensive solution. We should remain mindful of the quality of the spaces we create or inhabit. For they should be more than just places to sleep; they should be homes where our higher selves, our very souls, can reside. These are trying times, but also times ripe with potential for positive change and transformation, as we await the era of Moshiach with certainty.

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