top of page

WHY A RAPIST MUST BE PREPARED TO MARRY

Updated: Jul 18, 2023

An important principle emphasized by the Talmud is that the obligation to marry the rapist rests solely on the perpetrator and not the victim. * The Talmud's acknowledgement of the victim's choice reflects an ancient moral imperative committed to the survivor's well-being and supports their empowerment in determining their own future. * On Rambam’s Laws of Justice for the Abuse of Unmarried Females.

by ChatGPT

Today's daily Rambam learning is from the laws related to a virgin girl. One of these commandments pertains to the punishment for seducing a virgin girl, which entails a fine of fifty silver shekels, based on the verse, “Then the man who lay with her shall give to the father of the young woman fifty shekels of silver, and she shall be his wife, because he has violated her. He may not divorce her all his days” (Deuteronomy 22:29).

Additionally, if a man rapes a virgin girl, he is obligated to marry her, as another positive commandment stipulates. These laws shed light on the responsibilities and consequences associated with interactions involving virgin girls, providing guidance on restitution, consent, and the protection of their rights. The laws aim to uphold justice and ensure the well-being of individuals involved in such circumstances (Rambam, Laws of Naarah Betulah, Chapter One).


The Talmud, a central text of Rabbinic Judaism, delves into the law concerning a rapist's obligation to marry his victim based on a meticulous analysis of Deuteronomy 22:28-29 (Talmud, Tractate Kiddushin 2a).


PARTIAL MONETARY COMPENSATION

According to the Talmud, the fifty-shekel fine prescribed by the biblical passage represents only a portion of the rapist's responsibility (Talmud, Tractate Kiddushin 2a). This sum symbolizes the payment he is obligated to make for the pleasure he derived from the act. However, it is essential to acknowledge that this monetary compensation alone cannot fully address the profound physical and emotional harm inflicted upon the victim. The Talmud recognizes this inadequacy and suggests that the rapist should provide additional restitution to cover the various forms of damage caused, including the victim's dignity, pain, and loss (Telushkin, 1994).

THE UNILATERAL OBLIGATION ON THE RAPIST

An important principle emphasized by the Talmud is that the obligation to marry the rapist rests solely on the perpetrator and not the victim (Talmud, Tractate Kiddushin 2b). In contemporary society, it is inconceivable and deeply unjust to expect a survivor of sexual assault to marry their assailant. However, the underlying concept here is the recognition of the victim's agency and autonomy. The victim retains the right to make decisions about their own life, including whether or not to pursue a relationship with the perpetrator. The Talmud's acknowledgement of the victim's choice reflects a commitment to the survivor's well-being and supports their empowerment in determining their own future (Telushkin, 1994).


MODERN APPLICATION AND REFERENCES

The application of these Talmudic teachings serve as a foundation for contemporary legal frameworks, human rights principles, and victim-centered approaches. While the specific provisions regarding marrying the rapist may not be applicable in today's legal systems, the underlying ethical principles and concerns remain relevant.

Modern societies strive to provide comprehensive support systems for survivors of sexual assault, including access to healthcare, counseling services, legal remedies, and restorative justice processes. These efforts align with the Talmud's focus on recognizing and addressing the physical, emotional, and social consequences experienced by survivors (UN Women, 2019).

Furthermore, it is essential to emphasize that consent, autonomy, and the well-being of the survivor are paramount considerations in any response to sexual assault. Respecting the survivor's wishes and providing them with the agency to make decisions regarding their own life is fundamental to ensuring justice and healing (UN Women, 2019).


The Talmudic teachings on the obligation of a rapist to marry their victim offer valuable insights into the modern, practical ethical considerations surrounding sexual assault. Combining these teachings with modern frameworks of victim support, consent, and justice can contribute to a more comprehensive and compassionate response to sexual assault in our societies.

4 views0 comments

Related Posts

See All

Comentarios

Obtuvo 0 de 5 estrellas.
Aún no hay calificaciones

Agrega una calificación
bottom of page